Print isn’t dead. (Unless your mailing data isn’t fielded correctly.) #IPD17

UAA-Mail-734x4002015 study commissioned by the USPS Office of Inspector General found that “91 percent of customers chose to receive their bills by mail.” Even among Millennials, the digitally native generation, a whopping 89 percent opted for printed and mailed statements.

This is good news for a lot of printers. But those of us who make our bread and butter on mailed communications had better bolster not only the quality of our mailing data, but also the proper fielding of that data.

Reason number one: your printed impression may wind up in a dead pile of undeliverables. Number two: you may lose track of your clientele. And number three: you may be imposed with a monetary fine by the USPS.

That’s right, the Postal Service is cracking down on mailing performance with a grading system that intends to minimize the lost revenue caused by undeliverable mail and misdirected pallets.

One of the many tactics Bacompt has employed to meet these standards is setting our data lists to optimal National Change of Address (NCOA) captures. However, we also understand that the improper fielding (or formatting) of data can render NCOA useless. For instance, any mailpiece that displays an individual’s name in the address field will cause NCOA to fail. Mail never arrives at the intended recipient, the quality of your customer database is compromised, and you lose profits on wasted postage and unwanted fines.

Data quality and formatting is just the tip of the iceberg. For more information than you ever wanted to know about postal compliance, check out the USPS Guide to the Mailer Scorecard.

Or, we could help you figure it out. Contact us today.

#IPD17

 

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